blessed to have touched the sun
cinzia, 19, this blog is mostly pop music and birds I guess
( Spectators)


via: tiit
source: whatthefauna


earthandanimals:


Northern Cardinal by Dave Van de Laar

earthandanimals:

Northern Cardinal by 


rhamphotheca:

A male semipalmated sandpiper (Calidris pusilla) is recorded as flying over 10,000 miles in the past year! This tiny bird also made a remarkable six-day, 3,300-mile nonstop flight across the Atlantic Ocean from James Bay to South America, before moving on to his wintering area in Brazil… 
(read more)
photo: Bill Thompson, USFWS
(via: USFWS Southeast Region)

rhamphotheca:

A male semipalmated sandpiper (Calidris pusilla) is recorded as flying over 10,000 miles in the past year! This tiny bird also made a remarkable six-day, 3,300-mile nonstop flight across the Atlantic Ocean from James Bay to South America, before moving on to his wintering area in Brazil…

(read more)

photo: Bill Thompson, USFWS

(via: USFWS Southeast Region)



via: zodiacbaby
source: sixpenceee

zodiacbaby:

sixpenceee:

According to a study in the journal Animal Cognition, chimpanzee’s do something that seems altogether arbitrary: ear accoutrements.

“Our observation is quite unique in the sense that nothing seems to be communicated by it,” says study author Edwin van Leeuwen, a primate expert at the Max Planck Institute in The Netherlands.

To figure out if this was really a tradition, and not just chimpanzees sticking grass in their ears at random, van Leeuwen and his colleagues spent a year observing four chimp groups in Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage Trust, a sanctuary in Zambia.

There’s no genetic or ecological factors, the scientists believe, that would account for this behavior — only culture.

Chimpanzees putting grass in their ears is like us wearing earrings. 

SOURCE & MORE INFORMATION

she is giving us a LOOK

me as a scientist ^



via: dendroica
source: debunkshy
debunkshy:

#yellow warbler
#governor’s island #wi

debunkshy:

#yellow warbler

#governor’s island #wi


creatures-alive:

Proboscis Monkey by mike turtle on Flickr.

creatures-alive:

Proboscis Monkey by mike turtle on Flickr.



via: deoxify
source: phototoartguy
phototoartguy:

bonding pregnant zebra, Masai Mara, Kenya by cirdantravels on Flickr.

phototoartguy:

bonding pregnant zebra, Masai Mara, Kenya by cirdantravels on Flickr.


rhamphotheca:

The owl-faced monkey (Cercopithecus hamlyni) is found mainly in bamboo and tropical moist forests of the Virunga National Park in the Democratic Rep. of Congo. It is one of 218 mammal species found in Virunga, including 22 primates.  The monkey is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. Many of its haunts are being lost as forests are cleared for agriculture. It is also caught in the crossfire of a civil war. The population is estimated to have declined by 30 per cent in the past three decades. image: Rod Williams/Naturepl.com
(via: New Scientist)

babe

rhamphotheca:

The owl-faced monkey (Cercopithecus hamlyni) is found mainly in bamboo and tropical moist forests of the Virunga National Park in the Democratic Rep. of Congo. It is one of 218 mammal species found in Virunga, including 22 primates.

The monkey is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. Many of its haunts are being lost as forests are cleared for agriculture. It is also caught in the crossfire of a civil war. The population is estimated to have declined by 30 per cent in the past three decades.

image: Rod Williams/Naturepl.com

(via: New Scientist)

babe



via: koryos
source: funkysafari
funkysafari:

Cassowary by Geographic Ecotourist

funkysafari:

Cassowary by Geographic Ecotourist


adorablespiders:

Gladicosa gulosa carrying her hundreds of spiderlings on her abdomen
AS: this is a great picture! look at those babies!
submitted by reallymadscientist

adorablespiders:

Gladicosa gulosa carrying her hundreds of spiderlings on her abdomen

AS: this is a great picture! look at those babies!

submitted by 



via: 10bullets
source: brazenbvll
brazenbvll:

Elephants in Namibia : (Otto Klaus) 

brazenbvll:

Elephants in Namibia : (Otto Klaus


strange-loris:

This is the cutest freaking reptile I’ve seen in a long time.
They look like lizards, but aren’t- the tuatara are part of a distinct lineage from lizards, and are endemic to New Zealand. They have a third, parietal eye on the top of their head, have no external ears, and are believed to be capable of living up to 200 years.
Photo: [x]

strange-loris:

This is the cutest freaking reptile I’ve seen in a long time.

They look like lizards, but aren’t- the tuatara are part of a distinct lineage from lizards, and are endemic to New Zealand. They have a third, parietal eye on the top of their head, have no external ears, and are believed to be capable of living up to 200 years.

Photo: [x]


realmonstrosities:

Sea Cucumber anus is among the world’s most fascinating anus!

Sure they poo through it, but they also breathe through it, feed through it and aggressively cough up toxic organs through it.

Sometimes crabs and fish like to pop in for a visit!

No wonder some of them protect themselves with anal dentata.



via: earthandanimals
source: MSN
magicalnaturetour:

Jengo the baby gorilla enjoys a bout of tickle time with adult gorillas in his enclosure at Leipzig Zoo in Germany. Jengo lapped up his play time with female gorilla Kumil, flashing his bright smile and big eyes as the frolics unfolded..  Jenis Meyer/AP

magicalnaturetour:

Jengo the baby gorilla enjoys a bout of tickle time with adult gorillas in his enclosure at Leipzig Zoo in Germany. Jengo lapped up his play time with female gorilla Kumil, flashing his bright smile and big eyes as the frolics unfolded..  Jenis Meyer/AP