blessed to have touched the sun
cinzia, 19, this blog is mostly pop music and birds I guess
( Spectators)

"

Suddenly her mom’s silence matched Jackie’s own. “Oh, my God,” she murmured in disbelief. “Are you gay?”

"Yeah," Jackie forced herself to say.

After what felt like an eternity, her mom finally responded. “I don’t know what we could have done for God to have given us a fag as a child,” she said before hanging up.

[…]

She got a call from her older brother. “He said, ‘Mom and Dad don’t want to talk to you, but I’m supposed to tell you what’s going to happen,’” Jackie recalls. “And he’s like, ‘All your cards are going to be shut off, and Mom and Dad want you to take the car and drop it off at this specific location. Your phone’s going to last for this much longer. They don’t want you coming to the house, and you’re not to contact them. You’re not going to get any money from them. Nothing. And if you don’t return the car, they’re going to report it stolen.’ And I’m just bawling. I hung up on him because I couldn’t handle it.” Her brother was so firm, so matter-of-fact, it was as if they already weren’t family.

"  -

You should read this Rolling Stones piece on Queer kids getting kicked out by their religious parents. And remember it.  (via feministbatwoman)

Since founding the center, Siciliano, 49, has become one of the nation’s most outspoken homeless advocates. “I feel like the LGBT movement has been asleep at the wheel when it comes to this,” he says, running his hands through his closely cropped hair and sighing. “We’ve been so focused on laws – changing the laws around marriage equality, changing ‘don’t ask, don’t tell,’ getting adoption rights – that we haven’t been fighting for economic resources. How many tax dollars do gay people contribute? What percentage of tax dollars comes back to our gay kids? We haven’t matured enough as a movement yet that we’re looking at the economics of things.”

Siciliano also understands that the kids he works with don’t sync up with to the message everyone wants to hear: It gets better. “There is a psychological reality that when you’re an oppressed group whose very existence is under attack, you need to create this narrative about how great it is to be what you are,” he says. “It’s like, ‘Leave the repression and the fear behind and be embraced by this accepting community, and suddenly everyone is beautiful and has good bodies and great sex and beautiful furniture, and rah-rah-rah.’ And, from day one of the Stonewall Riots, homeless kids were not what people wanted to see. No one wanted to see young people coming out and being cast into destitution. It didn’t fit the narrative.”

(via voreyeur)



via: scenicroutes
source: glowcloud

glowcloud:

The weirdest thing is that people talk about “coming out” as if it’s this big momentous thing that only happens once while in actual fact it’s something that you do almost every single day every time you talk to a new person every time you’re in a new situation you’re constantly weighing your options, the ability to be your true self vs the advantages of being a false self and honestly it’s so fucking exhausting


posted 2 months ago on 28/6 52,376 notes
#lgbtq

via: peevesies
source: autisticmerrill

autisticmerrill:

support butch lesbians

support flamboyant gay men

support polyamorous bisexuals and pansexuals

support sex-repulsed asexuals

don’t throw people under the bus because they “fit a stereotype” you deem negative that you try to distance yourself from



via: enbieteddy
source: micdotcom

policymic:

Portraits challenge what it means to be LGBT

These are just some of the many ways members of the LGBT community identify themselves in a beautiful photo series from San Francisco-based photographer Sarah Deragon.

Deragon’s “The Identity Project” has taken her around the country as she “seeks to explore the labels we choose to identify with when defining our gender and sexuality.” Her portraits show the amazing diversity and vibance of a queer community that for too long has been defined by outsiders.

See more and quotes from Deragon

Follow policymic



via: jehovahwetness
source: maliatatc

gagegoliqhtly:

no more cis men playing trans women

no more equating trans women to men because they have the same genitals at birth

no more cis men getting awards for trans women roles while actual trans women are getting ignored

more trans women playing cis women. more trans women being treated like women instead of men in makeup. more trans women.



via: enbieteddy
source: grimmdocnut

coolkidhermes:

destroy the belief that ‘gender neutral’ or ‘androgynous’ means dressing like a boy

destroy the belief that masculine is the default


"Lesbophobia is dual in nature. It’s not only hatred for women who are attracted to women. It’s also hatred for women who are not attracted to men."  -

lesbiangoggles (X)

I really need this as a stand-alone on my dash right now, because that last part gets erased completely 99% of the time. 

(via relax-o-vision)


lifeandsshit:

back-before-dawn:

The US is on a superiority high over Russia and gay rights, and yet.

Look at what Kansas just did.

SIGNAL BOOST THE SHIT OUT OF THIS & SIGN THE DAMN PETITION: http://www.change.org/petitions/gov-sam-brownback-void-your-gay-segregation-law


The Fatal Transgender Double Standard 

chauvinistsushi:

transitiontransmission:

A few days ago, Katie Couric interviewed transgender model Carmen Carrera, andOrange is the New Black star Laverne Cox. For whatever reason, Couric chose to veer suddenly into questioning Carrera about how her “private parts” are “different now” and if she’s had that surgery yet. Carmen shushed her immediately, and reminded Couric that’s a very private issue. In the next segment with Laverne, Couric went right back to asking Ms. Cox about the genitalia question.

Laverne’s answer was flawless.

"The preoccupation with transition with surgery objectifies trans people and then we don’t get to really deal with the real lived experiences. The reality of trans people’s lives is that so often we’re targets of violence. We experience discrimination disproportionately to the rest of the [LGBT] community. … [B]y focusing on bodies, we don’t focus on the lived realities of that oppression and that discrimination."

Other commentators have noted that the bodies of transgender people are somehow public domain. Though Laverne alluded to it, not only are our bodies expected to be public domain, but so are our histories. The results of this unrealistic expectation are horrific.

In Australia, police took a man into custody. While there, the police (illegally) informed him that his girlfriend was a post-operative transsexual. After being released from police custody, he went home, found his girlfriend sleeping, and woke her up by repeatedly bludgeoning her with a glass ash tray until it tore her lips off. After she lost consciousness, he took her to the attic balcony and threw her over the rail onto the concrete two floors below.

The police who leaked this information got community service as punishment.

In Scotland, a transgender man has been convicted of rape and placed on the sex offender list for not disclosing to his girlfriend that he was transgender before engaging in consensual sexual activity.

I have seen it expressed that any transgender person who does not tell their partner that they have transitioned is guilty of rape, and that violence against the transgender person is merely an act of justifiable self-defense. The way this man stuck his hands down the pantsof a transgender woman without her consent and then beat her when he found out her birth gender. One commenter on this assault summed up how transgender people are expected to know their place:

"Since heterosexual males generally are not looking for a person of the same physical sex as them, shouldn’t this transgender person have informed the man that she is in reality a male? "Anita" Green is the problem here, not the poor guy who got duped."

When 18-year-old Angie Zapata’s boyfriend found out she was transgender by forcibly groping her, he bludgeoned her to death with a fire extinguisher. A commenter on theDenver Post summed up society’s feelings in one sentence: “This transgender brought it on himself…”

Not only are our bodies not our own, neither are the history of your genitals or your genetics. For whatever reason, this seems to only apply to transgender people.

Is there societal acceptance of someone who beats a woman when he finds out she’s a quarter Jewish? Are men required to tell if they’re circumcised? Women have to announce if they’re had a clitoral hood piercing? Is it self-defense if you murder your boyfriend because you found out he’s not a gold star gay like you? How about throwing your girlfriend off a balcony when you find out she identified as bisexual before she identified as a lesbian?

From Gwen Araujo, to Brandon Teena, to Angie Zapata, to Cemia Dove, our lack of ownership of our bodies has meant being forcibly stripped, groped, raped, strangled, stabbed burned, and bludgeoned. It means that transgender panic defenses live on in court, and sometimes even win. After Brandon McInerney shot Larry King twice in the back of the head in the middle of a crowded classroom, the jury deadlocked on the case. Some even sympathized with the murderer. “[Brandon] was just solving a problem,” one juror said.

Since Couric’s interview, much has been written about how transgender people seem to have no expectation of privacy. Laverne alluded to the violence that the transgender community faces. Couric’s expectation that transgender people have little right to physical privacy is an expression of the cause.

 

Follow Brynn Tannehill on Twitter: www.twitter.com/BrynnTannehill

DEFEND TRANS WOMEN AT ALL COST


one thing I don’t get about the lgbtq rights movement is how same-sex marriage is only for cis white gay guys

like isn’t marriage a resource for immigrants to gain citizenship and not be deported (which I know for a fact has happened in the past) and don’t poorer people have the most to gain from marrying and gaining the financial benefits? idk I just feel like everyone can benefit from marriage and just because cis white gay males are the face of the lgbtq rights movement doesn’t mean it only affects them?

let’s just work at everything all at once okay team


posted 7 months ago on 27/1 2 notes
#lgbtq

molleficent:

'family values' aka the most insidious form of homophobia aka 'i don't hate gay people but marriage is between a man and a woman' aka 'i just don't think its right for a child to be raised without a mother AND a father' aka 'i read the headline of some evo-psych article on the daily mail and i don't agree with that lifestyle' aka 'I'm not a bigot it's just my opinion'




via: allwecanbe
source: bossybussy

"

Female-assigned intersex kids’ vaginal canal size is also assessed by doctors, to ensure that it’s long enough to fit a penis inside of it. Doctors might surgically construct or re-construct vaginas, which can result in a host of health problems and necessitate multiple, multiple surgeries. This is especially the case since most intersex kids have these surgeries very young, and when their bodies grow into their adult forms, more surgeries are necessary to keep their vagina size in proportion. Non-surgical methods are also used to increase or maintain vaginal length by regularly using medical dildos to stretch the vagina over months and years. (It’s kind of like braces for your vagina, but much, much worse.) Just like there are no standards for how long a clitoris “can” be before it’s classified as a penis, there aren’t absolute standards as to how long a vagina is for it to be of “normal” length.

I had a dilation procedure performed for almost every exam I had with intersex doctors from the time I was 8 until I was 16, so that they could check how long my vagina was as I grew. I absolutely hated these procedures. I mean, imagine a man as old as your father or your grandfather, who you don’t know, inserting a medical dildo into you each time you saw him, knowing that you can’t question the doctor’s orders and just accept that you have to undergo these uncomfortable procedures for your health. Imagine a decade or so later, realizing that these procedures did nothing to track your health, and had everything to do with grown men feeling good about the fact that you could fuck some dude someday like a “normal girl”. That all those traumatizing procedures weren’t actually medically relevant at all, and it actually was within my right to refuse those examinations.

I didn’t know any of that at the time.

I also had no idea that I wouldn’t want to ultimately have the kind of sex they assumed I’d be having, adding yet another layer of this-was-totally-unnecessary/messed-up to my history.

Other kids shouldn’t have to go through this. Other adults shouldn’t have revelations some day far into the future that what was happening to them WASN’T okay, and their traumatic feelings ARE valid, and the whole system of how intersex people are conceptualized and “treated” IS entirely fucked.

And it’s gotta change. We’ve gotta change it.

"  -

—-Claudia at Autostraddle

I just read this article and was reminded once again how invisible the intersex community often is… we need to signal boost this shit to let people know that this kind of “medical treatment” is NOT okay.

(via bossybussy)

Intersex oppression is patriarchy, it is heterosexism, it is misogyny; it is simultaneously violent and invisible. 

(via angryseawitch)


"And I realize it’s somewhat patronizing to ask this question, but why can’t Kate McKinnon bring a girl home to her twin bed? She’s already playing every prominent lesbian on the show."  - the AV Club, pointing out what we were all thinking about that Twin Bed sketch from last night’s SNL (via gertrudefrankenstein)


"

While a gay man might casually mention his husband, or a lesbian might out herself by talking about her girlfriend, bisexuals are often wrongly assumed to be straight or gay depending on who they are with. Spelling out that they are bisexual can be misconstrued as rejecting a current partner or declaring themselves up for anything.

Faith Cheltenham, president of the national bisexual organization BiNet USA, was often presumed to be lesbian when she dated women. When she met the man who would become her husband, she worried people would assume she was straight, invalidating the work she did to come out.

But when she tries to correct that assumption, some mistake it as a sexual invitation. They say, “Why would you tell me you’re bi when your husband is right there?” Cheltenham said.

"  -

Why bisexuals stay in the closet - latimes.com (via babecrew)

workin’ on a letter to give to andrea gibson at their okc performance about the way they talk about bisexuality, need yr info and stamina internet

(via swellshark)